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What is the definition of HDR photography?

seattle, ACT theater, union avenue, downtown seattle, city, city center, urban

HDR is an acronym for High Dynamic Range.

Sue Chastain at Graphicsoft offers this definition: “High Dynamic Range, or HDR, is a digital photography technique whereby multiple exposures of the same scene are layered and merged using image editing software to create a more realistic image, or a dramatic effect. The combined exposures can display a wider range of tonal values than what the digital camera is capable of recording in a single image.”

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photographySince 2009 I have been creating HDR images. I simply love the vibrance, colors, and final truly evocative impression that HDR offers. When you create using the High Dynamic Range processes your image leaves you feeling as if you were standing right there while the photo was capture.

HDR allows you transform a flat uninspiring image into a work of art. To create my “Stunning HDR Photographs” I use two these four software packages.

Adobe Lightroom 5 for Digital Photographers

Photomatix Pro

Topaz DeNoise

OnOne Photo Suite 10.0

If you are simply starting out in the HDR world you can create stunning images using only LightRoom and Photomatix Pro. The other two software products will only go one step further to helping reduce noise in your photos and enhance colors, contrast, and overall dynamics of the final image.

Malcolm Gladwell wrote Outliers. He repeatedly mentions the “10,000-Hour Rule”, claiming that the key to achieving world class expertise in any skill, is, to a large extent, a matter of practicing the correct way, for a total of around 10,000 hours.

Practice HDR wrong and you risk wasting time at perfecting your art and craft. Learn from the HDR expert Trey Ratcliff at Stuck in Customs the correct was to produce award winning travel HDR photos.

I recommend Trey Ratcliff’s Stuck in Custom Ebook Bundle. His books are simple to read and understand and really shed the light on great photography using HDR techniques.

Here are a few of my most recent HDR photographs that people seem to enjoy. This shows the sort of style I have arrived at over the years by using Malcolm Gladwell’s theory of 10,000 hours to mastery, plus techniques shared by Trey Ratcliff at Stuck in Customs.

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photography

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photography

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photography

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photography

 

seattle, washington, northwest, HDR, HDR photography, travel photography, photography

Spencer McDonald

P.S. Trey Ratcliff reveals 100% new stuff! In the first hour, you’ll know all the basics, and beyond that, you’ll learn an amazing collection of new tricks, workflow, and post-processing techniques that will give your photos a great and unique look. Excellent for any skill level, from beginner to advanced.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • me February 17, 2016, 8:53 pm

    “High Dynamic Range, or HDR, is a digital photography technique whereby multiple exposures of the same scene are layered and merged using image editing software to create a more realistic image, or a dramatic effect.”

    I want to say I’m assuming you submitted your own site to Stumble Upon (or paid for sponsorship), and this is a critique from a successful pro photographer for a decade, before switching back to a technical career. It would be nice if you posted one image that created a “more realistic image” and not just a “dramatic effect.” The final three almost looked realistic, unless you have experience shooting.

    HDR is a modern crutch, akin to selective color photography, long exposure road photos, and such. Generation after generation there is a silly style that doesn’t really work. HDR can be an incredible tool, if used with subtlety. It’s a neutral density filter on steroids, what is not to love? Unfortunately, when all you have is a hammer every problem looks like a nail, and people hammer the hell out of every photo trying to drive the nails.

    • Spencer McDonald February 17, 2016, 9:09 pm

      Hello…

      Truly appreciate your comment on this post. Let me be clear, HDR photography is the thing I do. Some love it and some do not. It is art and as such art is always subjective.

      As a side note: My HDR photographs have sold all over the world. So there are people who do LOVE what I do. Thank you for engaging. Cheers.